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FND 2019 MAINSTAGE

Tuesday, October 8

Mînowin: Dancers of Damelamahamid

8pm, LSPU Hall

Mînowin illuminates the process of finding direction; it is an exploration of organic moments when we connect with one another that breathe new life into our artistic practices, and a critical experiment with performance space.

Through integrating narrative, movement, song, performance, and new multimedia design, Mînowin connects landscapes and Coastal form line with contemporary perspectives of customary Indigenous dance forms. The Dancers of Damelahamid aim to achieve this by drawing from our origin stories and exploring ways to translate this through a contemporary lens.

Aiming to be transformative, Mînowin revolutionizes how we have learned to work within and claim space through balancing the performance space by adding contemporary reflections of Indigenous identity, immersing audience in a narrative that illustrates moments of connection, understanding, and renewal.

Wednesday, October 9

YES: LINNEA SWAN

8pm, LSPU Hall

A Manifesto for the post-cynical, YES is an irreverent romp through the turbulent history of modern dance. Known for her fearless approach to controversial issues, Performer/Creator Linnea Swan rigorously integrates dance, theatre and bouffon to address Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 No Manifesto and it’s legacy on the current state of contemporary performance.

Say yes to YES!

photo credit: Jill Willcott

photo credit: Jill Willcott

Wednesday, October 9

#heybabylove: robyn breen

8pm, LSPU Hall

#heybabylove has been a work in progress since 2017. It came to life while spending hours alone in a studio, trying to create "my" way of working. The performance of #heybabylove has a nostalgic yet unimportant connection to music from 1997. This work seriously doesn't take itself too seriously. It is an exploration of physical strength and auditory recognition. It is a slow burn. It tests my limits, and maybe yours. I'm working on making the impossible possible. And the impossible is only impossible in my world. And the impossible is always changing.

photo credit: Chelsea Abram Photography

photo credit: Chelsea Abram Photography

Wednesday, October 9

OPERA WITH STAIRCASE: SHARON B. MOORE

8pm, LSPU Hall

In this solo created for dancer Hilary Knee, a muse recounts her tumultuous journey with life on the stage; fantasy, beauty, hope, wealth and poverty. It is a survival story of epic proportions. Grand and miniature, strange and heartbreaking, it explores a world of the dramatic heart.

Wednesday, October 9

CORNERED/BREATHING: Mateo Galindo Torres

8pm, LSPU Hall

This work is inspired by the emotional walls we create to deal with difficult events. It is an abstract and instinctual response to the act of building and tearing those walls apart, and what it takes to do so. CORNERED/BREATHING reflects on the way we morph our perception of reality in order to avoid dealing with our emotions, and what happens when we eventually face their existence. 

In the creation process, Robyn and I touched on her personal experiences as a woman, and we used them as inspiration for the work. Ideas of entrapment, honesty, courage and safety came up during this process. CORNERED/BREATHING is an invitation to reconsider our lives and to see our past through a different light.

Thursday, October 10

Trust: 10 Gates Dancing

8pm, LSPU Hall

In TRUST, Tedd Robinson joins with long-time collaborator, composer/performer Charles Quevillon, to co-create an exploration of that which binds us. The work grows from an assured reliance on the belief that performers and audience have arrived here together after a series of decisions and discussions, with the mutual aim of exchange. 

TRUST
A REQUIEM FOR WOOD AND STONE 

A primitive mystery of vulnerability and transformation.

When the wooden man starts to sing,

The stone woman gets up to dance.

Dongshan Liangjie (circa 850 c.e.)

photo credit: Michael Luke

photo credit: Michael Luke

friday, october 11

For/tress: Sarah Joy Stoker

8pm, LSPU Hall

This new solo, Fort/tress continues to explore what are the common themes in Stoker's work, those of the ecological crisis, extinction, displacement, conservation, and stewardship, industry, consumption, consumerism and the fundamental disconnect humans and development have had from the physical natural world. We are rocked with grief, we mourn, we are paralyzed and desperate, we feel panic and we try to hold on to hope. A departure for Stoker within this work in particular is the clear and specific look to the female, the mother, the matriarch. We cannot separate the conversations around climate change, ecosystems, refugees, food security or poverty from the female. She is on the front lines, she is the creator and nurturer, the protector and not often enough, should be a facilitator, a leader. This work puts sexuality of the female on display, treading an obscure and tenuous line between submission and repression, misogyny, aggression, power, pain and pleasure.

photo credit: Annette Manning

photo credit: Annette Manning

Friday, October 11

MAMMOTH: ANDREA COOPER

8pm, LSPU Hall

Mammoth is a performance for the stage —an exploration of the ancient, contemporary, and future of sex and technology. Written and performed by the artist, the piece features three characters whose stories echo each other. Interacting with video projections, and transforming between character through real-time audio processing, the anchor of the story is a female embodied voice who refuses to die through physical and material time. From the last woolly mammoth who lives on a weather scabbed island in Siberia, to a socially isolated woman who lives with a murderous dog, to a sex doll robot in the future who debates the ethics of consent, three characters respond to each other and embark on a voyage to the heart of the inexplicable. The performance investigates women’s conflicted relationship with technology —the struggles between what women want, technology’s control over existence, and the depths of loneliness.

photo credit: Ethan Folk

photo credit: Ethan Folk

Friday, October 11

COMING OVER AN ENVIRONMENT: Alicia Grant

8pm, LSPU Hall

“COMING OVER AN ENVIRONMENT” makes questions about the feeling of a room filled with people. I want to investigate how to influence the vibe of a room with my body and some other tools. Is it possible? Like a smell coming over an environment, it comes and goes and transforms and continues. I want to address the space and place and time we are actually in but then also make a fantasy. Make a trip. Make an illusion. Using the practice of kinesthetic whatever as an undercurrent to the process, kinesthetic whatever might be transferred amongst the people in the room. Whatever being a word to make a space for not knowing.

SAturday, October 12

MAGNETIKAE: La Otra Orilla

8pm, LSPU Hall

La Otra Orilla is working this year on her new show, a creation for four performers – a dancer, a singer, a pianist and a percussionist. The first will take place in the spring of 2019.

Myriam Allard and Hedi Graja bring together two diametrically opposed worlds: that of a language, flamenco, and that of the imagination, embodied by the ice floe. Creating a powerful sensorial universe, playing with the wealth of contrasts and dissonance born out of these two extremes, they place the concepts of exile and the other at the heart of this face-to-face performance.

In this new offering, the iconoclastic duo assembles a visual environment, sound references and elegant, passionate colours, continuing a journey they began ten years ago. A flamenco story on an ice floe—the senses collide in an original and poetic piece.



Banner Image: Dancers of Damelamahid, photo: Chris Randle